Curriculum mapping for the Education Testkit

On this page, you will find a comprehensive list of Ontario and Quebec elementary and secondary school curriculum expectations that are intended to connect to our material within the Education Testkit field guide

The listed curriculum connections apply to the basic Water Rangers testing procedure using our Education Testkit. We have also provided curriculum connections for lesson plans that are given in the Education Testkit. These are listed under separate subheadings below.

Ontario Elementary

Grade 4 – Understanding Life systems Habitats and Communities

Overall Expectations

  1. analyse the effects of human activities on habitats and communities
  2. investigate the interdependence of plants and animals within specific habitats and communities; 
  3. demonstrate an understanding of habitats and communities and the relationships among the plants and animals that live in them.

Specific Expectations

1. Relating Science and Technology to Society and the Environment

  • 1.1 analyse the positive and negative impacts of human interactions with natural habitats and communities

2. Developing Investigation and Communication Skills

  • 2.5 use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including habitat, population, community, adaptation, and food chain, in oral and written communication 

3. Understanding Basic Concepts

  • 3.1 demonstrate an understanding of habitats as areas that provide plants and animals with the necessities of life (e.g., food, water, air, space, and light)
  • 3.3 identify factors (e.g., availability of water or food, amount of light, type of weather) that affect the ability of plants and animals to survive in a specific habitat
  • 3.10 describe ways in which humans are dependent on natural habitats and communities (e.g., for water, medicine, flood control in wetlands, leisure activities)

Grade 5 – Understanding Matter and Energy Properties of and Changes in Matter

Overall Expectations

  1. conduct investigations that explore the properties of matter and changes in matter 

Specific Expectations

2. Developing Investigation and Communication Skills

  • 2.2 measure temperature and mass, using appropriate instruments (e.g., a thermometer, a single-pan balance)

Grade 6 – Understanding Life Systems Biodiversity

Overall Expectations

  1.  assess human impacts on biodiversity, and identify ways of preserving biodiversity
  2. demonstrate an understanding of biodiversity, its contributions to the stability of natural systems, and its benefits to humans.

Specific Expectations

1. Relating Science and Technology to Society and the Environment

  • 1.1 analyse a local issue related to biodiversity (in this case, effects of unnatural human-made chemicals on water, and generally, unexpected changes in pH)

3. Understanding Basic Concepts 

  • 3.2 demonstrate an understanding of biodiversity as the variety of life on earth, including variety within each species of plant and animal, among species of plants and animals in communities, and among communities and the physical landscapes that support them
  • 3.7 explain how invasive species (e.g., zebra mussel, Asian longhorned beetle, purple loosestrife) reduce biodiversity in local environments

Grade 7 – Understanding Life Systems Interactions in the Environment

Overall Expectations

  1. assess the impacts of human activities and technologies on the environment, and evaluate ways of controlling these impacts
  2. investigate interactions within the environment, and identify factors that affect the balance between different components of an ecosystem
  3. demonstrate an understanding of interactions between and among biotic and abiotic elements in the environment.

Specific Expectations

1. Relating Science and Technology to Society and the Environment

  • 1.1 assess the impact of selected technologies on the environment

2. Developing Investigation and Communication Skills

  • 2.1 follow established safety procedures for investigating ecosystems (e.g., stay with a partner, wash hands after investigating an ecosystem)
  • 2.3 use scientific inquiry/research skills (see page 15) to investigate occurrences (e.g., a forest fire, a drought, an infestation of invasive species such as zebra mussels in a local lake or purple loosestrife in a wetland habitat) that affect the balance within a local ecosystem
  • 2.4 use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including sustainability, biotic, ecosystem, community, population, and producer, in oral and written communication
  • 2.5 use a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes

3. Understanding Basic Concepts 

  • 3.1 demonstrate an understanding of an ecosystem (e.g., a log, a pond, a forest) as a system of interactions between living organisms and their environment
  • 3.8 describe ways in which human activities and technologies alter balances and interactions in the environment (e.g., clear-cutting a forest, overusing motorized water vehicles, managing wolf-killings in Yukon)
  • 3.9 describe Aboriginal perspectives on sustainability and describe ways in which they can be used in habitat and wildlife management (e.g., the partnership between the Anishinabek Nation and the Ministry of Natural Resources for managing natural resources in Ontario)

Understanding Matter and Energy Pure Substances and Mixtures

Overall Expectations

  1. evaluate the social and environmental impacts of the use and disposal of pure substances and mixtures

Specific Expectations

1. Relating Science and Technology to Society and the Environment

  • 1.1 assess positive and negative environmental impacts related to the disposal of pure substances (e.g., uranium) and mixtures (e.g., paint, sewage)

2. Developing Investigation and Communication Skills

  • 2.1 follow established safety procedures for handling chemicals and apparatus
  • 2.4 use scientific inquiry/experimentation skills to investigate the properties of mixtures and solutions
  • 2.6 use a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes 

3. Understanding Basic Concepts

  • 3.8 describe the concentration of a solution in qualitative terms (e.g., dilute, concentrated) and in quantitative terms (e.g., 5 grams of salt in 1000 ml of water)
  • 3.10 explain why water is referred to as the universal solvent

Grade 8 – Understanding Matter and Energy Fluids

Overall Expectations

  1.  analyse how the properties of fluids are used in various technologies, and assess the impact of these technologies on society and the environment
  2.  demonstrate an understanding of the properties and uses of fluids.

Specific Expectations

1. Relating Science and Technology to Society and the Environment

  • 1.2  assess the impact of fluid spills on society and the environment, including the cost of the cleanup and the effort involved

Understanding Earth and Space Systems Water Systems

Overall Expectations

  1. assess the impact of human activities and technologies on the sustainability of water resources
  2. investigate factors that affect local water quality;
  3. demonstrate an understanding of the characteristics of the earth’s water systems and the influence of water systems on a specific region.

Specific Expectations

2. Developing Investigation and Communication Skills

  • 2.1 follow established safety procedures for the use of apparatus and chemicals (e.g., when using water-testing equipment and water-testing chemicals
  • 2.3 test water samples for a variety of chemical characteristics (e.g., pH, salinity, chlorine)
  • 2.4 use scientific inquiry/research skills (see page 15) to investigate local water issues
  • 2.6 use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including water table, aquifer, polar ice-cap, and salinity, in oral and written communication
  • 2.7 use a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes 

3. Understanding Basic Concepts

  • 3.2 demonstrate an understanding of the watershed as a fundamental geographic unit, and explain how it relates to water management and planning
  • 3.3 explain how human and natural factors cause changes in the water table
  • 3.5 explain changes in atmospheric conditions caused by the presence of bodies of water

Quebec Elementary

The Water Rangers Education Testkit field guide was mapped to cycles One and Two of the Quebec elementary Science & Technology curriculum in June 2021 by Julie Marcus and Annabel Cowan of McGill University.

Material World

Matter

  1. Properties and characteristics of matter in different states – other physical properties (e.g. elasticity, hardness, permeability and impermeability, solubility) ➌

j. Describes various other physical properties of an object, a substance or a material
(e.g. elasticity, hardness, solubility)

k. Recognizes the materials of which an object is made

Energy 

  1. Forms of energy  ➋ ➌

b. Identifies sources of energy in his/her environment (e.g. moving water, chemical reaction in a battery, sunlight)

  1. Transmission of energy – electrical conductivity (e.g. conductors and insulators)  ➌

Techniques and Instrumentation

2. Use of simple measuring instruments (e.g. rulers, dropper, balance, thermometer)   ➋ ➌

Earth and Space

Matter

  1. Properties and characteristics of matter on Earth – soil, water and air  ➋ 
    1. Compares the properties of different types of soil (e.g. composition, capacity to retain water, capacity to retain heat)
    2. Describes the various ways in which the quality of water, soil or air affects living things

Energy 

  1. Transmission of energy – thermal and electrical conductivity (e.g. conductors and insulators) ➌
    1. Describes methods for transmitting thermal energy (e.g. radiation, convection, conduction)

Techniques and Instrumentation

  1. Use of simple measuring instruments (e.g. rulers, dropper, balance, thermometer)   ➋ ➌

Appropriate Language

  1. Terminology related to an understanding of the material world ➋ ➌

Living Things

Matter

  1. Characteristics of living things
    1. Explains the basic needs of the metabolism of living Things (e.g.nutrition, respiration)  ➋
    2. Describes activities connected to the metabolism of living things (transformation of energy, growth, maintenance of systems and body temperature)   
    3. Distinguishes among the different types of embryonic development (viviparous for the majority of mammals, oviparous or ovoviviparous for the rest)   ➋

Energy 

  1. Sources of Energy for Living Things 

b. Explains the nutritional needs common to all animals(water,sugars,lipids, proteins, vitamins, minerals) ➋

d. photosynthesis in plants (e.g. need for water and carbon dioxide) ➌

f. Explains how water, light, mineral salts and carbon dioxide are essential to plants d. photosynthesis in plants (e.g. need for water and carbon dioxide) ➌

Systems and Interaction

1. Interaction between living organisms and their environment – living things and their habitats ➋ 

c. Identifies habitats and the animal and plant populations found in them

d. Describes how animals meet their basic needs within their habitat

3. Interaction between humans and their environment 

  1. Describes the impact of human activity on the environment (e.g. use of resources, pollution, waste management, land use, urbanization, agriculture) ➋ ➌

Techniques and Instrumentation

2. Use of simple measuring instruments (e.g. rulers, dropper, balance, thermometer)   ➋ ➌

  1. Appropriately uses simple measuring instruments (e.g.rulers,dropper, graduated cylinder, balance, thermometer, wind vane, barometer, anemometer, hygrometer)

Appropriate Language

  1. Terminology related to an understanding of living things  ➋ ➌
    1. Appropriately uses terminology related to an understanding of living things 
    2. Distinguishes between the meaning of a term used in a scientific or technological context and its meaning in everyday language (e.g. habitat, metamorphosis) 

Strategies

The Water Rangers Education testkit is intended to help foster student’s engagement in the scientific method by taking part in live, hands-on tests using real scientific instruments. As such, the testkit helps to connect with all fundamental aspects of scientific strategies listed under Cycles Two and Three.